13 Must-Have Books for Your Gardening Library

13 ‘Must Have’ Garden Books

The most important books on gardening I’ve reviewed that have a permanent place in my gardening library. All of these books should be on your essential reading list.

The post 13 Must-Have Books for Your Gardening Library appeared first on Big Blog Of Gardening.

I love gardening books. Over the years my gardening library has grown to epic proportions and many of the books I reviewed for Big Blog of Gardening have become indispensable references season after season. Some have profoundly changed the way I think about gardening, soil, and plants, and the interdependence of all of the species that live in our communities.

Below are 13 of the most important books on gardening I’ve reviewed that now have a permanent place in my gardening library. By important, I mean that the book is either an essential reference, or one that changed the way I think about my garden and the species (besides me) that depend on it. In any case, all of these books should be on your essential reading list. They’re in no particular order, as each gardening book has its unique merits.

Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation That Starts in Your Yard by Douglas W. Tallamy

also The Living Landscape

Doug Tallamy and Rick Darke’s 2015 book, The Living Landscape, was a seminal work on the importance of restoring biodiversity to our local landscapes. In it, they called on homeowners to create larger gardens with native species, remove invasive species, and reduce the size of their lawns. In Nature’s Best Hope, Tallamy continued his argument that America’s obsession with clear cut lawns and non-native plants is destroying the regional ecosystems that plants, insects, animals, and humans depend on.

living landscape doug tallamy

Growing Perennial Foods, A field guide to raising resilient herbs, fruits, and vegetables by Acadia Tucker

Growing Perennial Foods is squarely aimed at the beginning gardener with the basics on how to grow the most common perennial vegetables, fruits and herbs like raspberries, strawberries, beans, rhubarb, sage, sweet potato, tomato, peppers, lemon balm, and more. Many of these plants are thought of as annuals, but if you know how to overwinter them, they can be grown year after year, which defines them as perennials. Read our review.

growing perennial foods book review

Teaming With Nutrients by Jeff Lowenfels

also: Teaming With Microbes and Teaming with Fungi

The “Teaming” triad of books from Jeff Lowenfels are required reading for any gardener. Lowenfels’ impressive research reveals the breathtaking amount of life that occurs in your garden soil and how plants depend on us maintaining that ecological balance. These books will change your entire perspective on soil and plants.

The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan

Pollan, one of America’s great writers on the intersection of food, plants, and social policy, explores how and why humans domesticated four plants: the apple, the tulip, marijuana, and the potato. And how this domestication was at times less intentional and more of a co-evolution. While not a gardening book, per se, it will definitely help you understand the journey plants took from the wilds of jungles and forests and the top of the Andes, to your backyard. Read our review.